Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Othello Act 4 Summary Response

Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
Concluding sentence: restate main idea

Summary:  Act 4 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, he exemplifies how jealousy can take over someone’s life. Roderigo in particular portrays this, as he followed his ‘true’ love Desdemona to Cyprus in the attempt of winning back her heart. He bestows upon her jewels to elevate his status with her. He does all of this because he allows himself to be manipulated by Iago’s false words. Shakespeare’s Othello represents how jealousy can exert tremendous power over someone and their actions.

Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? Use the Rebuttal Progression
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
  

Response: Act 4 of Othello, William Shakespeare correctly portrays the idea that jealousy can take over someone’s life through Roderigo’s efforts to win Desdemona’s heart. At the beginning of Othello, just after Desdemona professed her love for Othello, Roderigo was so distraught that he confessed to thinking suicidal thoughts. However, Iago convinces Roderigo to follow Desdemona to Cyprus, and to woo her back as she inevitably falls out of love with Othello. When Roderigo is about to give up again, Iago convinces him to stay just a little longer. Roderigo’s heart, filled with jealousy of Othello and Desdemona’s love, believes him and stays longer. Finally, Roderigo is done with Iago telling him to stay, and tries to leave, and to tell Desdemona his true intentions with giving her jewels. Roderigo argues with Iago, complaining, “Every day thou daffest me with some device, Iago; and rather, as it seems to me now, keepest from me all conveniency than suppliest me with the least advantage of hope. I will indeed no longer endure it, nor am I yet persuaded to put up in peace what already I have foolishly suffered,” (Shakespeare, 4.3.175-180). Roderigo is telling Iago that he has waited and waited for Desdemona to show some inkling of love for him, such as what Iago is telling him is happening, but it hasn’t happened. Roderigo has been giving Desdemona all of his jewels and money in an attempt to woo her. Roderigo has let jealousy consume him and his actions. He, out of the blue, packed up and went to Cyprus, spent all of his money and gave all of his precious jewels away. However, Roderigo displays to the reader that jealousy doesn’t engross all of his thoughts and actions. When talking to Iago about his journey of trying to woo Desdemona, he tries to back out of the plot, and to return home to venice after getting his jewels back from Desdemona and explaining his actions to her. Roderigo explains that his efforts have yielded far too little results to warrant his continued living in Cyprus, saying, “'Faith, I have heard too much, for your words and performances are no kin together....I have wasted myself out of my means,” (Shakespeare, 4.3.183,185-186). Roderigo is saying that he has listened to too many of Iago’s lies, and that he won’t partake in it anymore. He explains that he has wasted too much time and money for his liking. Roderigo isn’t letting his jealousy of Othello to override himself, and is deciding to just go back to Venice and cut his losses. At first glance, Roderigo seems to have finally shaken the power of jealousy from his life. He seems committed to leaving Desdemona and Othello alone, and returning to Venice to reclaim his old life. One cannot deny that Roderigo certainly has the intention of ridding himself of his jealousy, and indeed tries to give up on his path of trying to woo Desdemona. While this view does seem plausible at first, one must take a closer look into the situation. Iago is also talking Roderigo into doing more drastic things to “reclaim” Desdemona, using Roderigo's jealousy of Othello to further his own agenda. Even if Roderigo is trying to get out of Iago’s plot, Iago keeps talking Roderigo deeper and deeper into the plan. Shakespeare’s Othello correctly conveys how jealousy can have an intimate and absolute control over one’s life and actions.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

REDONE- Othello Act 2

Summary Added to:

Summary: In act 2 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, the author portrays the power of words through the character’s manipulation of other people in the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Iago, as he manipulates Cassio, Roderigo, and Othello. The power of words is portrayed when Iago tells Cassio to befriend Desdemona to win back his lieutenancy, which is actually part of Iago’s plan to turn Othello against both Desdemona and Cassio. William Shakespeare uses the power of words in act 2 of Othello to illustrate the characters manipulation of each other.

Response Redone:

Response: In act 2 of Othello, by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare uses the application of the power of words in order to show how his characters manipulate each other. Because of the way Shakespeare portrays how Iago talks his way into turning everyone against each other, he is able to show how the power of words can influence the other characters. Another way Shakespeare portrays the application of the power of words is in the end, Cassio unknowingly plays into Iago’s master plan. Iago does this when Cassio loses his lieutenancy and is devastated about it. Appearing to be trying to cheer him up, Iago describes a plan in which Cassio can win back his status, reputation, and job. He describes his plan to Cassio, but afterwards, after Cassio has left, explains “Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes, and she for him pleads strongly to the Moor, I'll pour this pestilence into his ear, that she repels him for her body's lust. And by how much she strives to do him [Cassio] good, she shall undo her credit with the Moor. So will I turn her virtue into pitch, And out of her own goodness make the net that shall enmesh them all,” (Shakespeare 2.3. 374-382). Iago is showing how, when Cassio tries to tell his story to Desdemona, Iago will be whispering in Othello’s ear that Cassio and Desdemona are in love. Iago is using the power of words to get Cassio involved in the master plan so that Iago can take Cassio’s job.
However, Iago is sometimes actually hurting himself when he is describing to Cassio a plan to get his position back. His words of manipulation could backfire on him in this case if Othello refuses to believe that Desdemona has taken Cassio as her lover. Othello is steadfastly devoted to Desdemona, and it seems true in reverse to everyone else as well, and therefore Othello might not think that Desdemona would ever betray him. If Othello weren’t to believe Iago, then Iago’s carefully crafted plan could end up hurting himelf, and end up helping Cassio back to his lieutenancy. Iago explains his plan to help Cassio get back his lieutenancy, and it seems like an effective plan that will help Cassio. Iago illustrates to Cassio that he has to, “Confess yourself freely to her [Desdemona]; importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter...,” (Shakespeare 2.3.337-345). Iago’s plan to help Cassio to get back his lieutenancy is for Cassio to befriend Desdemona, and tell her his woes, while actually getting Othello to believe that the new friendship between Desdemona and Cassio is actually a physical relationship. Iago thinks that this plan will help him to the position of Lieutenant, but in Cassio’s eyes he thinks that Iago is innocent, and genuinely trying to help him. Although Iago is manipulating Cassio, this encouragement could help Cassio, and hurt Iago in the end.
Many think that Othello wouldn’t believe Iago about Desdemona and Cassio’s affair because of Othello’s reputation as a person who would trust his wife’s word. This would lead to the conclusion that he would believe his own wife when she denies any romantic connection to Cassio. We cannot deny that Othello has justified himself to readers as a meritable and trusting person. This interpretation is helpful, but it misses the important point that Iago is a master manipulator, and also that he will be telling Othello about the “affair” between Desdemona and Cassio, Othello has been seeing “evidence” with his own eyes. Also, Othello at this point will have no reason to doubt Iago’s honesty, when he is also of the opinion the Cassio is a worthless, untrustworthy knave. Shakespeare correctly portrays the power of words throughout Act 2 of Othello by using the characters to manipulate each other in a complex way.


Original Comment:
summary: make sure to properly punctuate title. Add title to concluding sentence.

Response: make sure to add a "why" to your response topic sentence.
Did you mean application not appliance?
Watch wordiness- some pieces need to be proofread.
Let's work on creating effective lead ins versus trying to force a lead in.
Explanations of quotes need to explain quote and connect to claim/counterclaim point.
Good start on rebuttal, but why use words such as" the counterclaim above seems like a reasonable conclusion " ? Work on creating more complex sentences and word choice.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Othello Act 2- Maren Porter and Chantelle Whittaker

Summary Response Outline
  • Not a Plot Summary,
  • There should be no opinion in a summary
  • No I, We, Us, You, etc...
  • Strong Verbs
  • Concise Summary
  • Attribute the ideas back to the author


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Summary: In act 2 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, the author portrays the power of words through the character’s manipulation of other people in the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Iago, as he manipulates Cassio, Roderigo, and Othello. The power of words is portrayed when Iago tells Cassio to befriend Desdemona to win back his lieutenancy, which is actually part of Iago’s plan to turn Othello against both Desdemona and Cassio. William Shakespeare uses the power of words to illustrate the characters manipulation of each other.


Response: ( all reactionary with evidence)(Make an argument)(take a position... correctly portrays/incorrectly portrays)
Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________Claim 1:Set-upEvidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )Explanation of quotation to prove claimCounterclaim 1: However, ....Set-upEvidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaimClaim 2:Set-upEvidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )Explanation of quotation to prove claimCounterclaim 2: Although, ....Set-upEvidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaimWhat are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? Use the Rebuttal ProgressionConcluding sentence: restate main idea


Response: In act 2 of Othello, by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare uses the appliance of the power of words to show how his characters manipulate each other. Because of the way Shakespeare portrays how Iago talks his way into turning everyone against each other, he is able to show how the power of words can influence the other characters. Another way Shakespeare portrays the appliance of the power of words is in the end, Iago unknowingly plays into his master plan. Iago does this when Cassio loses his lieutenancy and is devastated about it. Appearing to be trying to cheer him up, Iago describes a plan in which Cassio can win back his status, reputation, and job. He describes his plan to Cassio, but afterwards, after Cassio has left, explains “Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes, and she for him pleads strongly to the Moor, I'll pour this pestilence into his ear, that she repels him for her body's lust. And by how much she strives to do him [Cassio] good, she shall undo her credit with the Moor. So will I turn her virtue into pitch, And out of her own goodness make the net that shall enmesh them all,” (Shakespeare 2.3. 374-382). Iago is showing how, when Cassio tries to tell his story to Desdemona, Iago will be whispering in Othello’s ear that Cassio and Desdemona are in love. Iago is using the power of words to get Cassio involved in the master plan so that Iago can take Cassio’s job.
However, Iago is sometimes actually hurting himself when he is describing to Cassio a plan to get his position back. His words of manipulation could backfire on him in this case if Othello refuses to believe that Desdemona has taken Cassio as her lover. Othello is steadfastly devoted to Desdemona, and it seems true in reverse to everyone else as well, and therefore Othello might not think that Desdemona would ever betray him. If Othello weren’t to believe Iago, then Iago’s carefully crafted plan could end up hurting himself, and end up helping Cassio back to his lieutenancy. Iago explains his plan to help Cassio get back his lieutenancy, and it seems like an effective plan that will help Cassio. Iago tells Cassio, “Confess yourself freely to her [Desdemona]; importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter...,” (Shakespeare 2.3.337-345). Iago’s plan to help Cassio to get back his lieutenancy is for Cassio to befriend Desdemona, and tell her his woes, while actually getting Othello to believe that the new friendship between Desdemona and Cassio is actually a physical relationship. Iago thinks that this plan will help him to the position of Lieutenant, but in Cassio’s eyes he thinks that Iago is innocent, and genuinely trying to help him. Although Iago is manipulating Cassio, this encouragement could help Cassio, and hurt Iago in the end.
Many think that the counterclaim above seems like a reasonable conclusion because of Othello’s reputation as a person who would trusts. This would lead to the conclusion that he would trust his own wife when she denies any romantic connection to Cassio. We cannot deny that Iago’s words are uplifting and are motivating Cassio to befriend Desdemona and that Iago’s master plan could backfire on him if Othello trusts Desdemona over Iago. This interpretation is helpful, but it misses the important point that Iago is a master manipulator, and also that he will be telling Othello about the “affair” between Desdemona and Cassio, when Othello has been seeing “evidence” with his own eyes. Also, Othello at this point will have no reason to doubt Iago’s honesty, when he is also of the opinion the Cassio is a worthless, untrustworthy knave. Shakespeare correctly portrays the power of words throughout Act 2 by using the characters to manipulate each other in a complex way.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Maren Porter and Chantelle Whittaker Othello Summary Response

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Act 1 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, clearly explains the idea that jealousy is present in all people. This characteristic is portrayed by the majority of the characters in Act 1, especially Iago, Roderigo, and Brabantio. This is showed by how these characters are jealous of the Moor or Cassio. William Shakespeare illustrates the tales of how the jealousy in other people’s lives can make them want revenge on others.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb,correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays___________ because ___________ .
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea

Act 1 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, correctly portrays the idea that jealousy can overtake someone’s life and choices. Iago shows this after he has discovered that Othello has chosen Michael Cassio to be his lieutenant instead of Iago himself. Iago feels that this was a poor choice because Cassio has no experience in battle, and is “Mere prattle without practice” (Shakespeare, 1.1.27).  Iago tells Roderigo, “For when my outward action doth/demonstrate the native act and figure of my heart in compliment extern, ‘tis not long after but I will wear my heart upon my sleeve for daws to peck at. I am not what I am,” (Shakespeare, 1.1.67-71) Iago is showing Rodrigo that his plan is to pretend to be Othello’s friend but really be trying to destroy him. Iago is also jealous of Cassio because Othello chose Cassio over Iago to be his lieutenant. Iago may think subconsciously believe that Cassio has something that Iago does not, which causes jealousy. He uses this jealousy to fuel the idea of revenge for Cassio as well as Othello. Roderigo is also jealous of Othello because he has won Desdemona’s heart. Shakespeare already has portrayed, even in act 1, that this jealousy has taken over Roderigo’s life. His jealousy has already allowed Iago to convince him to sell out Othello and Desdemona to Brabantio, Desdemona’s father. Also, after Desdemona tells her father and the Duke that she truly loves Othello, he is so distraught and jealous that he plans to commit suicide, which in the end is only thwarted by Iago. However, Iago shows that his jealousy of Othello and Cassio do not always influence his actions. Sometimes he shows genuine concern for his friend, Roderigo. Rodrigo is overcome with sadness at the notion that Desdemona does in fact love Othello, and wants to drown himself. Instead, Iago talks him out of it, “Come, be a man! Drown thyself? Drown cats and blind puppies. I have professed me thy friend, and I confess me knit to thy deserving with cables of perdurable toughness,” (Shakespeare, 1.3. 378-381). Iago shows that jealousy doesn’t rule his life and choices by taking time to talk his friend out of suicide, demonstrating that he does have interest in what happens to Roderigo. Iago forgot about his jealousy of Othello and Cassio in his genuine concern for his friend. One might think that Iago doesn’t let jealousy rule his life because he also cares for Rodrigo, and readily admits him to be his friend. One cannot deny that Iago does show his caring for Roderigo, especially when Rodrigo is planning to commit suicide, by talking him out of it. Roderigo wants to drown himself because Desdemona has proven that she really does love Othello. He crafts Roderigo a plan to win Desdemona after she falls out of love with Othello. While this view seems reasonable at first, one hasn’t taken into account the implied fact that Iago is creating a plan to plot revenge on Othello and Cassio, and is using Roderigo as an instrument to exact this revenge. This is proven after Iago is finished talking to Roderigo about how he should wait for Desdemona with money, so after she falls out of love with Othello, she would go into Roderigo’s arms. Shakespeare shows the readers that his plan uses Roderigo in an instrumental way, which means that he can’t let Roderigo die. Jealousy of Othello and Cassio is the only reason why Iago is being kind to Roderigo. Jealousy overtook Iago’s life and made Iago into a person that only cares about his friend because he needs Roderigo for his plan to work.  In act 1 of Othello, Shakespeare correctly portrays, through character traits and development, how jealousy can overtake someone’s life and actions, as well as cloud their judgement.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Bully Summary Response- Maren Porter and Sarah Haylsey

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


SUMMARY: Bully, directed by Lee Hirsch, portrays the untold story of bullying victims and their experiences. The documentary follows the unique lives of several teenagers’ involvement as a victim of bullying, as well as how they individually deal with the abuse. These people respond to their bully in a variety of different ways, such as creating movements, confrontation, self-harm, therapy, and moving away. The director traces the stories to the central idea of how bullying affects more than the bully and victim, but the entire community as well.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays) because ___________ .
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (  I, iii, 233-236  )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea




RESPONSE: Bully, directed by Lee Hirsch, correctly presents the idea of bullying being a widespread pandemic universally unrecognized, because of his in depth submersion into the lives of some victims and their families. Hirsch demonstrates that bullying is obscured from the general acknowledgement of the people. While speaking of his son, who committed suicide at age 11, Kirk Smalley, father of late Ty Smalley, explained “You know, we're nobodies. I guarantee you, if some politician’s kid did this, because he was getting picked on at a public school, there’d be a law tomorrow, there’d be changed made tomorrow. We’re nobody, but love each other and we loved our son [Ty Smalley],” (Hirsch). When Kirk Smalley compares the actions of his son, and the reaction therapon, to a politician’s theoretical son, he explains that because Ty was just a random kid, no one is going to take action. If the victim was the son of a person with power, people would notice how big of an issue bullying is and would take action immediately to rectify it. However, evidence shows that bullying is being recognized and actions are being taken to prevent it. Documentaries like Bully show and bring attention to this worldwide problem. “I would argue that someone that was looking with a keen eye, looking to understand and to see, could walk into a lunchroom and within five minutes point out the kids in that lunchroom that were bullied,” (Hirsch). If a qualified individual looked into these problems, then they could take action to prevent bullying. Also, movements like Stand for the Silent, who have helped over 1 million people all over the world with bullying bring needed attention to this problem. Many think that bullying is being taken into account and dealt with at the source. One cannot deny that movements are being made to prevent bullying, and they are working. But it’s more complicated than that. Some kids won’t tell an authority figure, or won’t take action themselves until it is too late. When finally starting to talk about his experiences, Alex Libby, a victim of longtime bullying, tells the documentary crew,  “They punched me in the jaw, strangled me, they knocked things out of my hand, take things from me, sit on me. They push me so far that, I want to become the bully,” (Hirsch). Alex’s story shows that bullying escalates far past what anyone would expect. Later, the camera crews thought that the bullying was so bad, they turned over footage to Libby’s parents and school authorities. They were shocked at how bad it actually was. Hirsch illustrates the pandemic that is bullying in his documentary, Bully (2011). He acknowledges bullying is globally unrecognized, and tries to bring more attention to it, so that actions will be taken to prevent it.